Heart Rescue

P1010944My father had quintuple bypass surgery in his 70’s.  Doctor’s said it was mainly due to his smoking since a teenager.  He quit in his 60’s but by then the damage was done.  I won’t even begin to recount how horrible the recovery was for him and our family.

On my Mother’s side of the family my Mother, my Aunt and Uncle all had arrhythmia’s and pacemakers.  

With this history I should have been more aware of heart disease but I really wasn’t UNTIL I needed a pacemaker.   Here’s  a scenario of a heart attack happening and what to do.  It will only take a few minutes of your time to give someone else a life time.

CLICK HERE to find out what you should do – http://www.heartrescuenow.com/

Click here for a site that lists the places you are most likely to locate an AED
Thanks Sharon for sharing this really important information

What Is an Automated External Defibrillator?

An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a portable device that checks the heart rhythm. If needed, it can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm. AEDs are used to treat sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

SCA is a condition in which the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating. When this happens, blood stops flowing to the brain and other vital organs.

SCA usually causes death if it’s not treated within minutes. In fact, each minute of SCA leads to a 10 percent reduction in survival. Using an AED on a person who is having SCA may save the person’s life.

Overview

To understand how AEDs work, it helps to understand how the heart works.

The heart has an internal electrical system that controls the rate and rhythm of the heartbeat. With each heartbeat, an electrical signal spreads from the top of the heart to the bottom. As the signal travels, it causes the heart to contract and pump blood. The process repeats with each new heartbeat.

Problems with the electrical system can cause abnormal heart rhythms called arrhythmias (ah-RITH-me-ahs). During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. Some arrhythmias can cause the heart to stop pumping blood to the body. These arrhythmias cause SCA.

  • The most common cause of SCA is an arrhythmia called ventricular fibrillation (v-fib). In v-fib, the ventricles (the heart’s lower chambers) don’t beat normally. Instead, they quiver very rapidly and irregularly.
  • Another arrhythmia that can lead to SCA is ventricular tachycardia (TAK-ih-KAR-de-ah). This is a fast, regular beating of the ventricles that may last for only a few seconds or for much longer.
  • Ninety-five percent of people who have SCA die from it—most within minutes. Rapid treatment of SCA with an AED can be lifesaving.

In people who have either of these arrhythmias, an electric shock from an AED can restore the heart’s normal rhythm. Doing CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) on someone having SCA also can improve his or her chance of survival.

One thought on “Heart Rescue

  1. This was an amazing post. I watched the video and it was fascinating! I didn’t realize the detail the AED had. Everyone should watch this and know how to do the compression. Thanks for posting this!!!!!

    Like

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