Origami Life

P1040124The Haiku-Heights prompt this week is origami, the Japanese art of paper folding.

Most people who have chronic illness and conditions stop talking.  We, along with friends, relatives and companions, get weary of the answers to “What’s new?” or “How are you?”.  My haiku were inspired by everyone who, not only has a chronic illness, has experienced the wearing away of identity.

creases paper thin

unfolded  hopes and dreams

tearing at the seams

* * * * *

Invisible folds

covered by passing of time

never meant to fly

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Haiku-Heightsprompt - ORIGAMI
Haiku-Heights
prompt – ORIGAMI

19 thoughts on “Origami Life

  1. “My haiku were inspired by everyone who, not only has a chronic illness, has experienced the wearing away of identity.”

    After reading your haikus yesterday, I drifted for awhile. Langston Hughes’ 1926 poem, “Dreams” and Lennon & McCartney’s 1968 “Blackbird” came to mind – interwoven with your eloquent and evocative pieces.

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  2. Hmm–really like the depth of these–the folds are like time-worn wrinkles on a person’s face, neither beautiful or ugly in and of themselves but certainly a part of who they are. 🙂

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  3. I almost cried, because it should have said “meant to fly.” Meant to fly. All of us. The silently wounded. I am sad for all of us. You know me, I’m not big on self-pity but this made me feel incredibly wounded, like a bird with a clipped wing that won’t ever fly again. The bird has it better than us, animals and people can SEE their pain. Love to you, With Enormous Pride, Peachy Keen Junior

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    1. Laurie,”
      The “never meant to fly” is both the feelings of sadness & resignation and the admonition that human’s, whatever their condition, must recognize both limitation and capacity, neither of which can be exceeded.

      I am so sorry it evoked woundedness (if that is a word?!). I try not to think we are wounded, just limited beyond our desire and capacity. It is what it is and somehow my ongoing task is to acknowledge that in the best way possible. It is a struggle.
      with love,
      j

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  4. Indeed! Perfect in its sentiment and brevity.

    May I post it on “Into the Bardo” … all links and credit as appropriate. I’ll check back for your answer. Thank you, Judith.

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      1. Thank you, Judith. The honor is ours. Also, I would welcome one or two features – maybe 1,000 words or less – on creative therapy (ineresting!)… if you have some things in your back pocket that are waiting for the light of an additional venue. If you are willing to share anything, email them to me at jamiededes@gmail.com

        I would like to add you to our contributing writers, if I may. I would need a photograph and a short bio. Here’s what we’ve done in the past:
        http://intothebardo.wordpress.com/contributing-writers/

        You blog is delightful, filled with good cheer … heartfelt and visually appealing. Thank you for sharing yourself here.

        With gratitude,
        Jamie

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