My Retirement – be eaten or worshipped. Do I have a choice? (parenthetically speaking)

(Since this is the first time I’ve ever retired it’s important to understand what lies ahead . . . and behind.   I hope history doesn’t keep repeating itself even when I do.)

The History of Retirement, From Early Man to A.A.R.P.

By MARY-LOU WEISMAN for the New York Times
 IN THE BEGINNING

“In the beginning, there was no retirement. There were no old people. (Very true – in the beginning I was much younger) In the Stone Age, everyone was fully employed until age 20, by which time nearly everyone was dead, usually of unnatural causes. Any early man who lived long enough to develop crow’s-feet was either worshiped or eaten as a sign of respect.” (I’ll take the worship and pass on being respected)

“Even in Biblical times, when a fair number of people made it into old age, retirement still had not been invented and respect for old people remained high.  In those days, it was customary to carry on until you dropped, regardless of your age group — no shuffleboard, no Airstream trailer. When a patriarch could no longer farm, herd cattle or pitch a tent, he opted for more specialized, less labor-intensive work, like prophesying and handing down commandments Or he moved in with his kids.” (I have no kids to hand down my commandments to so I’ll concentration on prophesying)

ELDER HOSTILE

“As the centuries passed, the elderly population increased. (Very true – as time has passed I’ve increasingly gotten more elderly) By early medieval times, their numbers had reached critical mass.  It was no longer just a matter of respecting the occasional white-bearded patriarch. Old people were everywhere, giving advice, repeating themselves (I’ve always repeated myself, my occupation has been giving advice that is worth repeating), complaining about rheumatism, trying to help, getting in the way and making younger people feel guilty.”

Hanging on
Hanging on

“Plus they tended to hang on to their wealth (I hang on to the fantasy of being wealthy) and property.  This made them very unpopular with their middle-aged sons, who were driven to earn their inheritances the old-fashioned way, by committing patricide. (. . . a few benefits to having no wealth) Even as late as the mid-18th century, there was a spate of such killings in France. In 1882, Anthony Trollope wrote a futuristic novel, ”The Fixed Period,” in which he foresaw retiring large numbers of old men to a place where they would be encouraged to enjoy a year of contemplation, followed by a peaceful chloroforming. (ANYTHING peaceful at my age is appealing) But this was hardly an acceptable long-term strategy.”

 . . . to be continued . . . if I live long enough . . .

Part II of Retirement History

9 thoughts on “My Retirement – be eaten or worshipped. Do I have a choice? (parenthetically speaking)

  1. Have a wonderful time ahead.. Pursue your calling.. Keep Reading, Writing, Sharing, Smiling , Laughing and Wondering and Inspiring and Being Creative..and ……………….. ( many more things) and keep visiting A Little More Than Ordinary…. RS

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  2. Where exactly is the planet Chloro where the elderly were peacefully sent? I know about Terra-forming (for Terra-Earth), but never heard of Chloro – must be the planet that replaced Pluto after it was demoted from planet-hood…

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  3. Dear curious, welcome to retirement! Judy, I love your blog. It makes me laugh and cry, sometimes at the same time!

    Don’t stop

    Kate Allison Kelly Sent from my iPhone 408.406.3326

    >

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Kate!
      Thank you so much for taking the time to comment – that means a lot to me. And thank you for reading . . . and liking my blog – it started out many years ago wanting to share the psychological information I’ve accumulated over the years and turned into a way to amuse myself!
      xxxx judy

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