Sneek a Peek into my Sketchy Life – Life imitates Art

Not too very long ago, I thought that really good artists (writers included) got it exactly right the moment they laid pencil to paper.  When I write posts I spend exponentially more time editing than on the first draft.  When I draw I correct and correct and correct some more. 

Not too very long ago, I learned that this is what 90% of artists, writers, dancers, singers etc. do . . .  adjust, correct, redo, undo . . . and it never will be perfect.  It’s knowing when to stop and move on.

It’s a great metaphor for life.  We keep adjusting, correcting and practicing, knowing we can’t get it perfect . . . just better.

LOVE LOVE LOVE this model.  She has curves.  

Much more fun to draw than muscle & bone.

Warm-up poses, 5 minutes

13 thoughts on “Sneek a Peek into my Sketchy Life – Life imitates Art

  1. I really love your drawings of nudes. My favorite art teacher always said that drawing the human form is the most difficult thing to draw and once you can do that, you can draw anything! I went through a stage of being passionate about drawing nudes, in particular the backs of the models heads and necks. Well, to be honest, this maybe was because I usually was the last to arrive in class and that was the only spot to be had.. but then I got hooked.

    You have captured the human form so well, especially in warm up sketches, not easy to do!
    NICE!

    Peta

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    1. Green Globe Peta,
      My drawing teacher makes sure the late arrivals can see all of the model so there’s no exuse to only draw part of the anatomy. On the other hand, she’s begun to encourage us to sketch what we are drawn to (no pun intended!) and begin to respond emotionally. So I would guess she’s be supportive of your pictures of backs of heads and necks!.

      Thank you for encouraging me. And I agree with you my “quickies” are generally better than the longer poses since I begin to over-think.
      Are you continuing to draw on your travels? Your photographs are definitely through an artistic lens.

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  2. I once knew an artist who said he never “erased.” I think you have the right idea, however. The mistakes have value to us, but we continue to work on, adjust and improve.

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    1. Ralie, You are right – mistakes are what help us learn and spur us to keep correcting what doesn’t work.

      I wonder if the artist you knew threw away the “mistakes” or simply had moved past the “learning phase”? Interesting.

      Thanks for taking your time to comment!!!! Verrrrrry interesting.

      Like

  3. Goodness you are getting good at this, Your drawings are wonderful, capturing the way the body slumps, the movement of mass. You are respectful of the human form and of the model in particular. I love the gestural marks suggesting shadow and the limited use of a bold line to define. Well done, well done.

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    1. Shari, B-P,
      Wowza, thank YOU! I find that I really love drawing the human form much more so than buildings, trees and the like. Not sure that comes from years of practicing therapy or just being innately interested in people instead of “things to begin with. This model is one of my favorites and I find that I’m getting better at capturing the essence rather than the exact likeness. This was one of my “I’m feeling better days” and I didn’t poop-out during the class.

      Like

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