It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s SUPERMOUSE!

They created a Supermouse.Superman can see the world in infrared.  Humans can’t.

Mouse eyes, like human eyes, are limited to seeing “visible light”,

which makes up just a tiny portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. 

SuperMouse by SuperPeggy

Researchers from the University of Science and Technology of China

and the University of Massachusetts Medical School developed an

“ocular nanoparticle” that can detect near-infrared light (NIR).

They injected it directly into the eyes of mice. Their study* 

shows that the mice were given “super vision”, allowing them

to see beyond the visible spectrum, without any effects

on their regular vision.

The team ran the mice through a series of water Y-mazes in an effort

to determine whether they could make out visual patterns in infrared

light to find a hidden platform. They trained the mice to associate an

infrared light pattern with the platform and then tested both injected

mice and non-injected mice to see how they fared.Mice that did no

t receive the ocular injections only correctly found the platform 50 percent

of the time, but those with the nanoparticles in their eyes were abl

e to do so around 80 percent of the time even in the dark.

Moreover, the nanoparticles continued to work for up to 10 weeks

without any residual side effects or long-term damage to normal vision.

Because the new technology is compatible with regular vision,

it could provide a new way for mammalian vision enhancement

or even open up new avenues to repair normal vision —

the nanoparticles could be tweaked so they parse different

wavelengths or alter them to deliver drugs into the eye.

*Published in Cell

2 thoughts on “It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s SUPERMOUSE!

  1. This is a fascinating article with implications for vision repair for those who need it. However, this particular post is showing, at least on my computer, with the article partially imposed over the right side bar info, making it difficult to read. Maybe you’re trying to exhibit how a broader spectrum might look? I noticed you “published in cell;” maybe that’s why the article looks so odd. I hope I don’t have to read all future posts this way, but as a one-time experiment about the limits of human vision, it’s provocative.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Shari,
      Oops–I do not know what happened, and am trying to fix it. This was an error, not planned. Published in Cell refers to the journal where the original article was published. I am working to see what went wrong in WordPress. Thanks for the heads up.
      Peggy

      Like

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