Eye my View – “Gourgous” Gorge

On a plane ride returning back to California from a trip to Alaska, I opened an in-flight magazine and was mezmerized by a picture of Multnomah Falls, a waterfall so beautiful that I knew I had to go see it in person.

620-foot (190 m)-high Multnomah Falls.

“Multnomah Falls, is located in the Columbia River Gorge – the area with the highest percentage of waterfalls (over 90) in the continental U.S.  The Columbia River Gorge is a canyon of the Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Up to 4,000 feet deep, the canyon stretches for over 80 miles as the river winds westward through the Cascade Range forming the boundary between the State of Washington to the north and Oregon to the south.”

The area is known for its high concentration of waterfalls, with over 90 on the Oregon side of the Gorge alone.[1] Many are along the Historic Columbia River Highway, including the notable The gorge was formed when an upstream glacier broke and came crashing through a riverbed towards the ocean. The flow of melting ice and debris widened the riverbed.

“The same Ice Age floods that created the Willamette Valley carved a wide river gorge through the Cascade Mountains, tearing through ancient volcanic rock and cresting at more than 700 feet high. After the floodwaters receded, they left behind a mighty river flanked by towering cliffs, its tributaries now flowing into dozens of towering waterfalls – the tallest, Multnomah Falls.”

Fairy Falls

I’m happiest around water and tons of water cascading over beautiful terrain was my idea of heaven on earth. I invited my two daughters and a friend to join me on what turned out to be a wonderful trip. We hiked steep trails, had picnics in the rain, and  decided we wanted to quit our jobs, move to Oregon and buy a small restaurant. Needless to say that never happened.

Horsetail Falls

“The Columbia River Gorge began forming as far back as the Miocene (roughly 17 to 12 million years ago), and continued to take shape through the Pleistocene (2 million to 700,000 years ago).”

We never opened the restaurant.  Now that I’m retired I’ll settle for a vacation home next to a waterfall and take-out dinner.

Peggy

See our post on Max Your Mind  “Falling water, raising spirits”

The HeART of Spirituality

GOD’S ART – POINTILLISM

“Each of these 48,741 dots represents a galaxy.

Each galaxy is a collection of billions of stars. The stars themselves trap untold planets, asteroids, and possibly even life in their gravitational clutches.”

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“But this image, which is just one-twentieth of the night sky, is a mere pinprick of a window into the universe. The universe is thought to be 93 billion light-years wide. The width of this image is 6 billion light-years.”

Read the entire article, click HERE

 Pointillism is a technique of painting in which small, distinct dots of color are applied in patterns to form an image.

Pointillism used the science of optics to create colors from many small dots placed so close to each other that they would blur into an image to the eye. This is the same way computer screens work today. The pixels in the computer screen are just like the dots in a Pointillist painting.

 

Frankly Freddie, EYE with a VIEW

Dear my Freddie Fans,

It’s hard to get Peggy to show her art (she’s more humble than Judy who seems to relish posting nude humans).  Peggy prefers nude animals.

She took these photographs at the San Diego Zoo,

a nudist camp if I ever saw one . . .

Peggy, clothed

Frankly,

Freddie Parker Westerfield, Roving Reporter

When people can see TIME

Time . . . we pass through it . . . or perhaps it passes through us . . . but do we SEE it?  Take a look: 

“I photograph by hand; this is not a time lapse. It’s my eye seeing very specific moments.  I like to describe myself as a collector.”  Steven Wilkes

“Once Wilkes has all the images, he picks the best moments of the day and the night and creates what he calls a master plate. Those images then get seamlessly blended into one single photograph, where time is on a diagonal vector, with sunrise beginning in the bottom right-hand corner. That process of creating a single image can take about four months — though it’s photographed in a single day.
of magical moments.”‘

View from The Savoy, London, Day to Night, 2013. Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

View from The Savoy, London, Day to Night, 2013.
Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

Times Square, NYC, Day to Night, 2010. Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

Times Square, NYC, Day to Night, 2010.
Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

Pont de la Tournelle, Paris, Day to Night, 2013. Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

Pont de la Tournelle, Paris, Day to Night, 2013.
Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

In this last photo of Serengeti National Park in Tanzania – “For 26 hours, Wilkes shot 2,200 photos without moving the camera and while suspended in the air in a tent-like structure with a little window, so that animals wouldn’t see or hear him as he photographed them coming to a watering hole from sunrise to deep into the night.”

Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, Day to Night, 2015. Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes/National Geographic

Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, Day to Night, 2015.
Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes/National Geographic

Read the interview and article by Nina Gregory here ‘When People Can See Time’: Photographer Captures Day, Night In One Image

Take a look at Stephen Wilkes Gallery Day to Night

What’s your biggest regret?

When I regret something I’ve done (or haven’t done) it’s a signal that I’ve not learned from my choice.  I believe that making mistakes, taking wrong turns is ultimately about learning and growing and not repeating what didn’t work.

Photographer Alecsandra Raluca Dragoi took pictures of people from all over the world sharing their greatest regrets. She captured a range of emotions—humor, heartbreak, and guilt.  It would be fascinating to talk to these same people in 10 years to see if they’ve learned from what they now regret.

Anyone can contribute to the ongoing project by taking a photo to share. Participants can send the image to the artist via a Facebook message. Dragoi references an anonymous quote as inspiration to those who wish to take part:

“If we spend our time with regrets over yesterday, and worries over what might happen tomorrow, we have no today in which to live.”

To see Alecsandra Dragoi’s site and many more photos click here.

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Counting up to 70 – “Up a Tree”

“Ye are all leaves of one tree and the fruits of one branch.” Baha’i

As I “count up” to my 70th birthday” I think more and more about choice & inevitability,  and the wonder of the unknown.  When I received these pictures from my friend Sharon they struck me as reflecting the human condition . . . mine included. 

unnamed-11Tree, speak to me

of essence

Speak to me.

unnamed-10reaching ever reaching

for the Source

unnamed-9clinging to the sky

soaring from the earth

unnamed-8growing visible invisible patterns

in time and space

unnamed-7clinging tenaciously

clinging by my roots 

 to a passage yet unknown

Thanks Sharon for sharing!

Becca Givens posts pictures of  trees she photographs on her blog Sunday Trees.  Becca has much more discipline than I do as it is every Sunday!  Here’s some of her “trees” Sunday Trees 03Sunday Trees 08Sunday Trees 26 in the Mayan Ruins