When people can see TIME

Time . . . we pass through it . . . or perhaps it passes through us . . . but do we SEE it?  Take a look: 

“I photograph by hand; this is not a time lapse. It’s my eye seeing very specific moments.  I like to describe myself as a collector.”  Steven Wilkes

“Once Wilkes has all the images, he picks the best moments of the day and the night and creates what he calls a master plate. Those images then get seamlessly blended into one single photograph, where time is on a diagonal vector, with sunrise beginning in the bottom right-hand corner. That process of creating a single image can take about four months — though it’s photographed in a single day.
of magical moments.”‘

View from The Savoy, London, Day to Night, 2013. Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

View from The Savoy, London, Day to Night, 2013.
Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

Times Square, NYC, Day to Night, 2010. Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

Times Square, NYC, Day to Night, 2010.
Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

Pont de la Tournelle, Paris, Day to Night, 2013. Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

Pont de la Tournelle, Paris, Day to Night, 2013.
Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

In this last photo of Serengeti National Park in Tanzania – “For 26 hours, Wilkes shot 2,200 photos without moving the camera and while suspended in the air in a tent-like structure with a little window, so that animals wouldn’t see or hear him as he photographed them coming to a watering hole from sunrise to deep into the night.”

Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, Day to Night, 2015. Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes/National Geographic

Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, Day to Night, 2015.
Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes/National Geographic

Read the interview and article by Nina Gregory here ‘When People Can See Time’: Photographer Captures Day, Night In One Image

Take a look at Stephen Wilkes Gallery Day to Night

What’s your biggest regret?

When I regret something I’ve done (or haven’t done) it’s a signal that I’ve not learned from my choice.  I believe that making mistakes, taking wrong turns is ultimately about learning and growing and not repeating what didn’t work.

Photographer Alecsandra Raluca Dragoi took pictures of people from all over the world sharing their greatest regrets. She captured a range of emotions—humor, heartbreak, and guilt.  It would be fascinating to talk to these same people in 10 years to see if they’ve learned from what they now regret.

Anyone can contribute to the ongoing project by taking a photo to share. Participants can send the image to the artist via a Facebook message. Dragoi references an anonymous quote as inspiration to those who wish to take part:

“If we spend our time with regrets over yesterday, and worries over what might happen tomorrow, we have no today in which to live.”

To see Alecsandra Dragoi’s site and many more photos click here.

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Counting up to 70 – “Up a Tree”

“Ye are all leaves of one tree and the fruits of one branch.” Baha’i

As I “count up” to my 70th birthday” I think more and more about choice & inevitability,  and the wonder of the unknown.  When I received these pictures from my friend Sharon they struck me as reflecting the human condition . . . mine included. 

unnamed-11Tree, speak to me

of essence

Speak to me.

unnamed-10reaching ever reaching

for the Source

unnamed-9clinging to the sky

soaring from the earth

unnamed-8growing visible invisible patterns

in time and space

unnamed-7clinging tenaciously

clinging by my roots 

 to a passage yet unknown

Thanks Sharon for sharing!

Becca Givens posts pictures of  trees she photographs on her blog Sunday Trees.  Becca has much more discipline than I do as it is every Sunday!  Here’s some of her “trees” Sunday Trees 03Sunday Trees 08Sunday Trees 26 in the Mayan Ruins

 

 

What Cities Would Look Like if Lit Only by the Stars

“Carl Sagan once said anything shining in the night sky does so because of distant nuclear fusion. The physics involved are awesome, and so too are the billions and billions of stars seen from here on Earth. But with every passing day, increasing light and air pollution from growing cities diminishes our ability to observe the cosmos.”

‘“By combining two realities, I am making a third that you cannot see … but it exists! I am showing you the missing stars,” says Cohen. “Photography is way of showing things that we can’t see. Photography is a way to dream. I am not showing you post-apocalyptic cities, merely cities without electricity. I am bringing back the silence.”’  French artist Thierry Cohen

To really see the impact of the night sky view FULL size pictures at: Wired, Thierry Cohen, Darkened Cities

Rio de Janeiro 22° 56’ 42’’ S 2011-06-04 lst 12:34

Rio de Janeiro

‘“Photography is about poetry more than it is about reality,” says Cohen. “It is how you see the world. You can show the world you want to show.”’

San Francisco 37° 48’ 30’’ N 2010-10-09 lst 20:58

San Francisco

“French artist Thierry Cohen draws attention to this creeping loss in his seriesVilles éteintes (Darkened Cities), which imagines the world’s largest cities under clear night skies. His photographs are as impossible as they are beautiful. The dark urban landscapes and vibrant constellations are composites of two images—one of the city and one of the sky.”

Los Angeles, Disney Hall

Los Angeles, Disney Hall

“Cohen has visited nine cities including New York, San Francisco, Rio De Janeiro, and Hong Kong. Using an equatorial tripod mount and polar-scope, Cohen captures an urban landscape, then travels to a less populated location at the same latitude with greater atmospheric clarity. Using this method, the skies above Shanghai are actually in Western Sahara and Paris is illuminated by the stars over Montana.”

Darkened Cities is on show at East Wing Gallery, Abu Dhabi until November 20.

 

Hooked on the Haiku BRANCH – tu haiku for yu

 Rooted in God’s love

we are all leaves of one tree

and fruits of one branch

“A fundamental teaching of Bahá’u’lláh, the founder of the Baha’i faith,  is the oneness of the world of humanity. Addressing mankind, He says: “Ye are all leaves of one tree and the fruits of one branch.”  

“In this way His Holiness Bahá’u’lláh expressed the oneness of humankind whereas in all religious teachings of the past, the human world has been represented as divided into two parts, one known as the people of the Book of God or the pure tree and the other the people of infidelity and error or the evil tree.”

“The former were considered as belonging to the faithful and the others to the hosts of the irreligious and infidel; one part of humanity the recipients of divine mercy and the other the object of the wrath of their Creator.

His Holiness Bahá’u’lláh removed this by proclaiming the oneness of the world of humanity and this principle is specialized in His teachings for He has submerged all mankind in the sea of divine generosity. Some are asleep; they need to be awakened. Some are ailing; they need to be healed. Some are immature as children; they need to be trained. But all are recipients of the bounty and bestowals of God.”

Golden Snub Nose

Golden Snub Nose

When you’re stuck in mud

need to climb to higher ground

any branch will do

 

Haiku Horizons – prompt BRANCH

On Dragonfly Wings with Buttercup Tea, Becca Givens 

The Baha’i World Faith

Bye Bye Summer, are you listening?

I’m jealous . . . I just read Laura’s Art from Trails End last post “Bye Bye Summer, It’s Been Fun”.  Geeeeeeeeeeesh – she went to a week-long poetry workshop, cruised the Rhine River, did art, entertained had house guests, contributed in meaningful ways to others and is writing a poetry book.

My summer:

  • Travel:  Watched HGTV House Hunters International.
  • Entertainment: Watched Golden Girls reruns on late night TV.
  • Accomplishments: Gained 6 pounds, blogged and worked.  
I'm not lisssssssstening . . .

I’m not lisssssssstening . . .

I decided to turn my jealousy into . . .  inspiration.  So I went to the Dana Point Harbor today to remind myself I live in a spectacularly beautiful part of this world. Thanks Laura for booting me out the door!

Dana Point Harbor, California

Dana Point Harbor, California

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I'm not lisssssssstening

I’m not lisssssssstening

 

In the Mind’s Eye!

There are marvelous and mysterious “things” that exist beyond human comprehension.

This short film explores the philosophical idea called solipsism. Solipsism.  Whether you ascribe to the idea that nothing exists outside your own mind it’s worth watching the beautiful visuals.  (I liked watching how it was made before watching the actual film.  Either way you watch, it’s fascinating and visually wonderful.)

How the video was made

 

Here’s the finished video

“SOLIPSIST is an experimental short film by Andrew Huang that won the Special Jury Prize at Slamdance 2012. 

“Solipsism (Listeni/ˈsɒlɨpsɪzəm/; from Latin solus, meaning “alone”, and ipse, meaning “self”)[1] is the philosophical idea that only one’s own mind is sure to exist. As an epistemological position, solipsism holds that knowledge of anything outside one’s own mind is unsure; the external world and other minds cannot be known, and might not exist outside the mind. As a metaphysical position, solipsism goes further to the conclusion that the world and other minds do not exist”. (Wikipedia)

How many times have I TOLD you to do something creative!?

I’ve reposted almost the entire NPR article for you because you might not remember how to

click here to access the URL.  You’re Welcome.

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Detail of a Mandela, by Ida

“Brain training is big business, with computerized brain games touted as a way to help prevent memory loss. But new research shows you might be better off picking up a challenging new hobby.”

“To test this theory, Dr. Denise Park, a neuroscientist at the University of Texas at Dallas, randomly assigned 200 older people to different activities. Some learned digital photography. Another group took up quilting.”

Quilting, which requires measuring and calculating, also helped improve participants' memory.

Quilting, which requires measuring and calculating, also helped improve participants’ memory.

Courtesy of UT Dallas

“Quilting may not seem like a mentally challenging task,” Park says. “But if you’re a novice and you’re cutting out all these abstract shapes, it’s a very demanding and complex task.”

“The groups spent 15 hours a week for three months learning their new skills. They were then given memory tests and compared with several control groups.”

First Magnolia by Cathy

” First Magnolia by Cathy

‘”Rather than just comparing them to people who did nothing, we compared them to a group of people who had fun but weren’t mentally challenged as much,” Park says”.

“That “social group” did things like watch movies or reminisce about past vacations. Another control group worked quietly at home, listening to the radio or classical music or playing easy games and puzzles.”

“Park’s research, which was published in the journal Psychological Science, showed that not all activities are created equal.”

“Only people who learned a new skill had significant gains.”

‘”We found quite an improvement in memory, and we found that when we tested our participants a year later, that was maintained,” Park says”.

“The greatest improvement was for the people who learned digital photography and Photoshop — perhaps, Park says, because it was the most difficult.”

“So how does learning a new skill help ward off dementia? By strengthening the connections between parts of your brain, says cognitive psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman. While brain games improve a limited aspect of short-term memory, Kaufman says, challenging activities strengthen entire

Icicles, by Ida

” Icicles, by Ida

networks in the brain.”

‘”It really is strengthening the connectivity between these team players of these large-scale brain networks,” he says.”

“Denise Park likens it to an orchestra.”

“Players come in and players go out,” she says. “Sometimes when something is really demanding, the whole orchestra is playing, but they’re not playing harmoniously.”

“The goal is to keep each individual player in best form, and make sure there’s coordination. And improving your own coordination, through quilting or learning to play bridge, may be a way to maintain your memory, and have a bit of fun, too.”

‘”We hope that by maintaining a very active brain, you could defer cognitive aging by a couple of years,” Park says.”

“There’s one more important thing you can do to ward off memory loss: exercise. Art Kramer, a neuroscientist at the University of Illinois, studies the impact of exercise on the brain”.

“In one study, he found that just 45 minutes of exercise three days a week actually increased the volume of the brain. Even for people who have been very sedentary, Kramer says, exercise “improves cognition and helps people perform better on things like planning, scheduling, multitasking and working memory.””

“So if you’re looking to boost memory, there’s reason to challenge both your body and your mind.”‘

I won’t say I TOLD you so . . .

Wordless Fairy Tales . . . Speechless Images

There are few people whose life’s work honors their mothers.

This spectacular photographs by Kirsty Mitchel are all inspired by her mother.  An excerpt from her biography:

“I was born in 1976 and raised in the English county of Kent, known to many as the ‘Garden of England’. My earliest memories were always of the stories read to me by my mother as a child … how it felt to be curled into her side, listening to the rush of her breath as she paused for effect, before launching into yet another characters voice. She was an English teacher, and read to me almost everyday, to an age I could no longer admit to my friends. She instilled in me the most precious gift a mother could, her imagination and a belief in beauty…… it became my root, and the place I constantly try to return to in my work, and my dreams.”

“Tragically my mother was diagnosed with a brain tumour, and my world fell apart. Photography became my only escape when I could no longer talk about how I felt. I lost myself in street portraiture, focusing on those who reflected my own sadness and loss. I later turned the camera inwards, and began photographing myself throughout the hardest year of my life. It became an utter fantasy that blocked out the real world, and a place where I could return to my memories of her, far away from those hospitals walls.”

“She died in November 2008 and that was when photography engulfed me, becoming an overwhelming passion that I could not stop. I found myself producing pieces that echoed the memories of her stories, and the belief in wonder I have always felt since a child.”

http://www.kirstymitchellphotography.com/

article-2613030-1D48F1FF00000578-518_964x570

This is her website where you can read about her WONDERLAND project and see all her portfolio:  http://www.kirstymitchellphotography.com/

or check out her flickr gallery:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/kirsty841/with/3500479250/

 

YOUR Brain in Living Color*

The stunning complexity blows my mind! (pun intended)

AC486918-6471-4671-9F5ABD9E294AA1CF

Cross-section

substantia nigra, which is involved in addictive behavior.

Substantia nigra, which is involved in addictive behavior.

Trunk lines: Nerve fibers in the human brain are arranged into bundles

Trunk lines: Nerve fibers in the human brain are arranged into bundles

Wiring

Wiring

*Not actually YOUR brain but verrrrrrrrrrry close. If you are curious click here http://www.scientificamerican.com/slideshow/new-view-of-the-brain-slide-show/#3 to read the interesting details of what you are seeing.

One night, One photograph, All One

John Stanmeyer, Photographer

John Stanmeyer, Photographer

“The photograph “Signal” was taken along the shores of the Red Sea on an evening of a full moon in Djibouti City, Djibouti. I was there on assignment photographing the story “Out of Eden”, a project with National Geographic explorer Paul Salopek related to our collective human migration out of Africa that began some 60,000 years ago.”

“I’ve been asked often over the past few days what this photograph means to me. Very simple — it felt as if I was photographing all of us — you, me, our brothers and sisters — all desperately trying to connect to our loved ones.”

“In this tenuous period of human migration where despair and hope simultaneously intertwine, we seek to find comfort, a sense of balance, a desire to be home, reconnecting to something stable, reassuring. This photograph of Somalis trying to “catch” a signal is an image of all of us as we stand at the crossroads of humanity, where we must ask ourselves what is truly important, demanding our collective attention in a global society where the issues of migration, borders, war, poverty, technology and communication intersect.”

John Stanmeyer, Photographer

Click here to read the full article and what is taking place in this photograph.

Thanks Rick for sending this link.

Award Winning Photos – Incredible!

Sony World Photography awards.  Click here – Ya gotta take a look at all of them.  But for those of you with click-a-phobia here’s just a few:

When you see these award-winning photos your face will look like this!

A baby Orangutan peeking out from his mother's embrace. (© Chin Boon Leng, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards)

A baby Orangutan peeking out from his mother’s embrace. (© Chin Boon Leng, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards)

Prototype for Year of the Fairy Tale Princess.

The knight and his steed, a tropical capture in Costa Rica. (© Nicolas Reusens, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards)

The knight and his steed, a tropical capture in Costa Rica. (© Nicolas Reusens, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards)

Leap’n Lizards!  er . . . wildebeasts

In July each year, this heart-pounding scene of wildebeests migration repeats itself in Kenya. (© Bonnie Cheung, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards)

In July each year, this heart-pounding scene of wildebeests migration repeats itself in Kenya. (© Bonnie Cheung, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards)

Leap’n . . .

A muddy face from the mud bath, going into the lake. (© Alpay Erdem, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards

A muddy face from the mud bath, going into the lake. (© Alpay Erdem, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards

Dancing with the Stars

That's dance. (© Hasan Baglar, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards) #

That’s dance. (© Hasan Baglar, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards) #

Magnificent aerial view

Aerial image of river delta in Iceland. (© Emmanuel Coupe, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards)

Aerial image of river delta in Iceland. (© Emmanuel Coupe, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards)

Caught mid-bath, a wet dog tries to save the last bit of dignity he has. (© Sophie Gamand, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards)

Caught mid-bath, a wet dog tries to save the last bit of dignity he has. (© Sophie Gamand, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards)

Back to the Future Photography -Brrrriliant

Chino Otsuka digitally inserts current photos of herself into old photographs of herself when she was a child in the 1970’s and 1980’s.

You gotta check this out. Beautiful, eery, thought-provoking and brilliant.  Here’s a sample!

Beach 2

1976 and 2005, Kamakura, Japan

Photographer Chino Otsuka binds the past and the present in her photo series titled,Imagine Finding Me.
http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/chino-otsuka-imagine-finding-me

Winter Wonderlands by Ida & Freddie

Dear Best Friend, Ida, Human Being.

Thank you for sending me these pictures you took.  I’m sending you pictures I took.  Your pictures are very beautiful but you are right . . . It’s good I live in the West.

Freddie Parker Westerfield, CDT

The East

ice storm_-7

The West

2013-11-24 11.14.12The West

ice storm_The East

20131128_103201The West

ice storm_-8The East

ice storm_-2Dog Walking, The East

20131128_104209Human Walking, The West

ice storm_

I would make territory on this tree (when it’s spring)

The Wild West

Wasn’t able to post from Phoenix, Arizona while I was there for my 50th high school reunion – couldn’t get internet access.

I stayed with a wonderful high school friend, Sharon and her husband Norris.  They have an incredible house in Cave Creek.  Here are a few pictures of  their neighborhood!  (Except for the first picture from the plane and the last picture of the Mouse)

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Flying into Phoenix

 

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Architecture

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Holes in saguaro cactus where Cactus Wrens nest.

The Arizona-Desert Museum: The saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) is one of the defining plants of the Sonoran Desert. These plants are large, tree-like columnar cacti that develop branches (or arms) as they age, although some never grow arms. These arms generally bend upward and can number over 25. Saguaro are covered with protective spines, white flowers in the late spring, and red fruit in summer.

DSCN5087Range

You find this cactus in southern Arizona and western Sonora, Mexico. At the northern portion of their range they are more plentiful on the warmer south facing slopes. A few stray plants can also be found in southeast California.

Life Span

With the right growing conditions, it is estimated that saguaros can live to be as much as 150-200 years old.DSCN5209

Size

Saguaro are very slow growing cactus. A 10 year old plant might only be 1.5 inches tall. Saguaro can grow to be between 40-60 feet tall (12-18m). When rain is plentiful and the saguaro is fully hydrated it can weigh between 3200-4800 pounds.

Extra Fun-facts

  • The saguaro is the largest cactus in the United States.
  • Most of the saguaro roots are only 4-6 inches deep and radiate out as far from the plant as it is tall. There is one deep root, or tap-root that extends down into the ground more than 2 feet.
  • After the saguaro dies its woody ribs can be used to build roofs, fences, and parts of furniture. The holes that birds nested in or “saguaro boots” can be found among the dead saguaro. Native Americans used these as water containers long before the canteen was available.


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Extra Fun-facts:

  • In Arizona you can carry a gun, concealed or open, without a permit!
  • Grasshopper mice are being studied about how they turn off pain pathways when being stung by scorpions. The  mouse is immune to scorpion venom and eats them like sirloin steak treats.
  • The first day I was there Sharon told me to keep a light on in the guest bathroom JUST IN CASE a scorpion decides to come in for a drink of water in the night.  (Next time I go I’m bringing a Grasshopper mouse with me) 
Grasshopper Mouse with his dinner snack

Grasshopper Mouse with his dinner snack

A “bicycle” built for 3

After sleeping until 11:30 am we hit the town.  Went to the Ferry Building which is now bereft of ferrys (the kind that float, not the kind that fly) and filled with shops and restaurants and people.  September & October are the months to visit San Francisco – wonderful weather!

Then, OF COURSE, we returned and worked on polishing our presentation for the International Imagery Conference.  One more day of sight-seeing . . . er polishing . . . before Daru and I head to Burlingame for the conference.

Here’s your picture post-card from our ferry trip:

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Ferry Building

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Inside Ferry Building

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Mushroom shop mushrooms

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More mushroom shop mushrooms

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A building with BLUE sky

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Some more mushroom shop mushrooms

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Golden Gate Bridge

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Even MORE mushrooms from mushroom shop

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Proof there is a mushroom shop

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Insult & affront to pigs everywhere

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Pedicab, up close and personal

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The End
bye bye

Marred by Varicose Veins

Spidery Black Things

New Theory

Spidery black things

planet mars varicose veins?

Mine are all purple

Are Those Spidery Black Things On Mars Dangerous? (Maybe)

by ROBERT KRULWICH

You are 200 miles directly above the Martian surface — looking down. This image was taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Jan. 27, 2010. (The color was added later.) What do we see? Well, sand, mostly. As you scroll down, there’s a ridge crossing through the image, then a plain, then dunes, but keep looking. You will notice, when you get to the dunes, there are little black flecks dotting the ridges, mostly on the sunny side, like sunbathing spiders sitting in rows. Can you see them?”

“What are those things? They were first seen in 1998; they don’t look like anything we have here on Earth. To this day, no one is sure what they are, but we now know this: They come, then they go. Every Martian spring, they appear out of nowhere, showing up — 70 percent of the time — where they were the year before. They pop up suddenly, sometimes overnight. When winter comes, they vanish.”

You GOTTA click here! to see the INCREDIBLE PICTURES and

read the rest of the really interesting article.

Elderly Animals

I will admit to tears watching this incredible short film about elderly animals.  When the picture of the dog that resembles Max appeared I felt like I was stabbed.

Whatever the creative expression medium – photography, painting, sewing, writing, dancing, singing etc – we create a “portrait” of ourselves. PLEASE take a moment to read, watch and reflect:

You must click on the link at the bottom after Isa Leshko’s statement to see the film.  Here are her own words:  “I am traveling to sanctuaries across the country to photograph animals that are elderly or at the end stage of their lives. I began this series shortly after I had spent a year in New Jersey helping my sister care for my mother who has Alzheimer’s disease. When my mother got ill, I made a conscious decision to not photograph her. However, caring for her had a profound impact on me and I knew the experience would influence my photography. Shortly after I had returned from New Jersey, I encountered a blind elderly horse that was living on a relative’s property. I was mesmerized by this animal and spent the afternoon photographing him. After reviewing my film, I realized I had found a project that would enable me to sift through my feelings around my mother’s illness.”

“Since that first encounter, I have sought out and photographed animals that come from diverse backgrounds so I could examine a range of elderly experiences. Some of these animals have experienced neglect and abuse before they were placed in sanctuaries. Others have been well cared for since an early age. Some appear very old; others are youthful despite their advanced ages.”

“Defining the age at which an animal is considered elderly is not always clear-cut. Factory farm chickens, for example, are slaughtered when they are around 42 days old so they are bred to mature quickly. Animals that have been abused frequently age prematurely and are plagued with health problems relating to their abuse. A few though are remarkably resilient and seem to have recovered fully from their traumas. For example, Teresa, a 13-year-old Yorkshire pig, experienced horrors early in her life, which you would never guess from looking at her. As I photographed her for this project, she made contented grunts while basking in the morning sunlight that spilled into the barn.”

“In order to achieve a sense of intimacy in these portraits, I spend several hours with the animals I photograph and I try to visit them multiple times. Depending on the animal, I may spend an hour or so simply lying on the ground next to the creature before I take a single image. This approach helps the animal acclimate to my presence and to my equipment and it allows me to observe the animal without being focused on picture taking.”

“I am creating these photographs to gain a deeper understanding about what it means to be mortal and to exorcise my fears of aging. I have come to realize that these images are self-portraits, or at the very least, they are manifestations of my fears and hopes about what I will be like when I am old. My intention is to take an honest and unflinching look at old age and I want these images to inspire others to become aware of and to engage with their own attitudes toward aging and mortality.”

“I also want my images to inspire greater empathy toward animals, particularly farm animals. It is rare to see a farm animal that has actually lived its natural life span given that most of these animals experience brutality and death early in their lives. By depicting the beauty and dignity of these creatures in their later years, I want to challenge people’s assumptions about these animals and inspire reforms to the treatment of farm animals.”

Elderly Animals Short Film  Link

This short film was created by Walley Films about Isa’s Elderly Animals project. Filming was done in San Antonio, Texas and in Kendalia, Texas in May 2011. Warm thanks goes to Wildlife Rescue & Rehabilitation for letting us film at their sanctuary.  http://www.isaleshko.com/Text_page.cfm?pID=5222