Did You Know? – Luscious Lipped Bat Fish

Luscious Red lips,
lanquid eyes
this guy’s in disguise
 a femme fatale?
 a walking bat?
Can you imagine that
A fish that doesn’t swim
Ogcocephalus darwini

An identity crisis of the first degree
he needs a psychoanalyst
It’s not normal to be THAT carefree

This Red-Lipped Batfish (aka Ogcocephalus darwini) walks around the deep waters of the Galapagos Islands.  They are terrible swimmers since their fins have evolved into legs.

To attract prey, the red-lipped batfish uses a shiny lure that comes out of its head once it gets really close to its preferred meal,  like crabs, mollusks and shrimp  Some scientists think the males’ red lips are attractive to females during mating season.  To each his own . . . 

Thanks to Charlie at Doodlewash for the inspiration.

Red-Lipped Bat Fish, NOT CHARLIE

It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s SUPERMOUSE!

They created a Supermouse.Superman can see the world in infrared.  Humans can’t.

Mouse eyes, like human eyes, are limited to seeing “visible light”,

which makes up just a tiny portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. 

SuperMouse by SuperPeggy

Researchers from the University of Science and Technology of China

and the University of Massachusetts Medical School developed an

“ocular nanoparticle” that can detect near-infrared light (NIR).

They injected it directly into the eyes of mice. Their study* 

shows that the mice were given “super vision”, allowing them

to see beyond the visible spectrum, without any effects

on their regular vision.

The team ran the mice through a series of water Y-mazes in an effort

to determine whether they could make out visual patterns in infrared

light to find a hidden platform. They trained the mice to associate an

infrared light pattern with the platform and then tested both injected

mice and non-injected mice to see how they fared.Mice that did no

t receive the ocular injections only correctly found the platform 50 percent

of the time, but those with the nanoparticles in their eyes were abl

e to do so around 80 percent of the time even in the dark.

Moreover, the nanoparticles continued to work for up to 10 weeks

without any residual side effects or long-term damage to normal vision.

Because the new technology is compatible with regular vision,

it could provide a new way for mammalian vision enhancement

or even open up new avenues to repair normal vision —

the nanoparticles could be tweaked so they parse different

wavelengths or alter them to deliver drugs into the eye.

*Published in Cell

Fur Fun: hard to watch

In the interest of full disclosure we have a tv in every room of our house, with the exception of the bathroom.  Several of them are so old they are neither flat, nor high definition.  I suspect they will outlast the latest models.

We didn’t have a TV at home until I was 10 years old.  It was black & white, there were only 3 channels and programs ended at midnight with test patterns.   I grew up reading, playing outside and making up ways to entertain myself with household objects.  It may partially explain why I’m relatively creative but doesn’t explain why I have the attention span of a gnat.

Fake Snake

Snake

When my granddaughter was a baby, I started keeping old toilet paper rolls, thinking we could make something to of them together, maybe a giraffe or other animal. Our first project was the easiest: a snake. We painted the rolls, then put a string through them. We used a small matchbox for the head. She trailed it behind her, letting it slither around the house.

Peggy

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My Brain on Non-standard Time

“You can become blind by seeing each day as a similar one.

Each day is a different one, and each day brings a miracle of its own.”
— Paulo Coelho

This morning  I woke thinking that today was yesterday.  This afternoon I thought that today is tomorrow. Holy Toledo! (wonder where that expression comes from?) Time is mushed in my mind.  

If cells in a petri dish can be taught to tell time I need a petri dish.

Cultured Brain Cells Taught to Keep Time

The UCLA findings are the first to suggest that networks of brain cells in a petri dish can learn to generate simple timed intervals.

The ability to tell time is fundamental to how humans interact with each other and the world. Timing plays an important role, for example, in our ability to recognize speech patterns and to create music.

In a three-year study, UCLA scientists attempted to unravel the mystery by testing whether networks of brain cells kept alive in culture could be “trained” to keep time. The team stimulated the cells with simple patterns — two stimuli separated by different intervals lasting from a twentieth of a second up to half a second.

After two hours of “training cells”, the team observed a measurable change in the cellular networks’ response to a single input. In the networks trained with a short interval, the network’s activity lasted for a short period of time. Conversely, in the networks trained with a long interval, network activity lasted for a longer amount of time.

Duke Researchers Find Brain’s Motor Center Keeps Time Too

By measuring activity in the brain as reflected by blood flow, Duke researchers have demonstrated for the first time that the brain’s motor control center also keeps track of time. Their experiments show that in both animals and people, the striatum, a portion of the brain once thought only to control movement, keeps track of timing short intervals, from seconds to minutes.

“In addition to providing the first map of a neural circuit for an internal clock, the results have implications for Parkinson’s disease patients, because the timing mechanism is located within the basal ganglia, which is damaged in people with Parkinson’s disease. The findings also may help define the role of timing in learning and memory, said Dr. Warren Meck, associate professor of experimental psychology at Duke University.”

“We believe timing is the foundation for learning and memory,” Meck said in an interview. He suggests that defective timing mechanisms may underlie some learning disabilities and may contribute to dyslexia. Before these experiments, how the brain keeps track of time intervals in the seconds to minutes range was unknown.”

ScienceDaily

Creative Expression – Running Out

My husband is always after me to exercise. In Southern California it’s difficult to use weather as an excuse so I’ve been using fibromyalgia brain fog rather creatively:
  • “What!? It’s midnight already!? I was just about ready to go for my walk”
  • “Are you sure? I could swear I exercised today”
  • “I couldn’t walk today. I locked myself in.”
  • “What do you mean the doctor stressed exercise?! I swear she said not to stress over exercise.”
I really had a good reason not to exercise when I began to get light-headed on my walks and figured out it wasn’t the heat, lack of food or dehydration. I suspected my heart arrhythmia.  
(It was heart arrhythmia that led to my getting Tullulah, my pacemaker.)
This is a series of pictures I did when I was first diagnosed with atrial tachycardia.  I wasn’t focusing or even thinking about my heart when I was painting.  I painted spontaneously and very quickly.  The only reason I painted 3 was that I didn’t want to waste paint and throw away what I hadn’t used.  About 6 months later as I was putting together a presentation it hit me that these paintings represented my heart.

It’s easy to identify which picture is my heart in normal rhythm and which paintings represent the various stages of arrythmia.
That is the wonder and power of Therapeutic Creative Expression.
Whether it’s painting on canvas, crayons on paper or magazine pictures in a collage we express our unconscious knowing and inner wisdom.

Now that my arrhythmia’s are under control the most exercise I’m getting is running out of excuses.

judy