“Z” is for Catching some Zeds. snooooooooozzzzzzzzzzzz

“A” started the day

with Anything Goes”

“Z” brings the challenge to a close

Posting 6 days a week was a chore

If by chance you found it a bore

give me some credit please

for helping you catch some zzzzzz’s

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“ZZZzzzzzzzzZZZZZZzzzzz”

English speakers equate sleep with zzzzzzzz, more specifically snoring.  The British call sleeping  “Catching some zeds.”

If I had earlier researched how languages represent “sleeping” I could have used this topic for 5 other letters of the alphabet:

  • “C”Germans use “chrrr,” which considering the typical German pronunciations of ch and r—is closer to snoring than “zzz.”
  • “R” – The French, who also favor a sonically rich r, use “rrroooo,” “rrr,” “roon,” “ron,” and so on. The Spanish similiarly use “rooooon.”
  • “G” – The Japanese use characters that transliterate as “guu guu,” 
  • “M”Mandarin Chinese use characters sounding like “hu lu.”
  • “K”Finns use “kroohpyyh,”

Why does Z stand for snoring

crbs0540508

“A” is for Annoying sounds

Chrrr, rrooooo, ZZZZ, guu guu, hu lu, kroohpyyh, 

and so ends the A to Z Alphabet Challenge

It’s been a snoooooozzzzzzzzzzzzz

“Y” is for Yu Yi – the desire to feel intensely again

In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, in the expert’s mind there are few.” Zen teacher Shunryu Suzuki

yù yī – 玉衣 is the desire to see with fresh eyes, and feel things just as intensely as you did when you were younger—before expectations, before memory, before words.

The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows
From Mandarin Chinese yù yī, literally “jade suit.” Some Han dynasty royals were made to wear ceremonial burial suits made of jade, stitched together in hundreds of pieces threaded together, like a suit of armor made of jade. Literally, it is to be ‘jaded’ in an attempt to protect yourself.

The Atlas Obscura includes this detail, which is useful for the metaphor: “Jade was believed to have preservative and protective qualities that would prevent the deterioration of soft tissues and keep away bad spirits. 

“X” marks the spot

“X” gets tired and worries a lot

always being the one

to mark the spot

afraid no one will find it

unless he is there

He does it for free

no complaints or “why me?”

It’s his lot in life

no children or wife

just spots to mark

It’s really no lark

not having a say

where he’s to stay

I bet you wouldn’t like

always being put on the spot

So the least you might do

is pay him a fee

or occasionally use

a “Y” or a “Z”

"x" by j

“x” by j

"I think she forgot to mention it's National Poetry Month as a rationale"

“I think she forgot to mention it’s National Poetry Month  . . . as a rationale”

“V” is for Vampire Squid

“The Vampire squid from hell

is actually rather quite swell

 He doesn’t suck blood

 or lurk in  the mud

but in chilly, dark waters drifts free

where he never eats meats

just low-calorie treats

that sink toward the bottom of the sea

A sighting is transforming

But here’s a forewarning

always go in the morning

and certainly not on a whim

For late at night you’ll die from fright

especially if you can’t swim

The scientific name for the species, Vampyroteuthis infernalis, translates to “vampire squid from hell,” but the animal’s behavior isn’t all that intimidating.

“Vampire squid drift in chilly, dark waters with low oxygen levels up to 9,800 feet (3,000 meters) below the surface. They have a low metabolism and they eat low-calorie foods — mostly “marine snow,” or clumps of particles, that sink down the water column.”

The new findings were published  in the journal Current Biology.”

“U” is for U-turn

U, A, E, I and O

The “U” we all knew

was stuck on the end

One day he decided to play

and not go to work in the usual way

He did a U-turn and went to the head

giving all the vowels he now led

a brand new way to be said

u, a, e, i, o by j

u, a, e, i, o by j

 

Sometimes “Y”

who is such a good guy

wants to go along for the ride

but for this little ditty

Sometimes Y’s just not witty

It’s just a fact I can’t hide

There she goes . . . again”

“R” is for Running low on petrol

Have you noticed that I’ve been amusing myself writing poems lately?  (If you haven’t noticed that is evidence you are not reading my blog as often as you should be!)

My chronic fatigue has reared its “rear”.  Sitting and moving my fingers on the keyboard, one at a time, is about all the physical energy I have had to expend.  (mental energy is another matter . . .)

There once was a  lass

who ran out of gas

As her windshield grew hazy

she became quite lazy

removing the rust from her a_ _

"I hope you didn't hear that!"

“I hope you didn’t hear that!”

“O” is for Good Ole “O”

A versatle lad

who never sounds bad

rounding his lips with OHs:

No nose knows if you stub your toes

Or sounds off with OW:

Don’t have a how-now-brown-cow.

(MOO MOO he oos toos)

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 This mellow fellow

makes different sounds

with whomever he surrounds

 When then he joins with an “i”, “y” or “u” 

he’s a  could, would should

and a coy boy toy

Good Ole “O”

sounding off on the go

"That's not an OH, it's an EH?"

“For a poem – it’s not an OH!, it’s an EH?”