Waltzing Matilda

When the billy boils

All Aussie ghosts do appear

Waltzing Matilda

 

Australia

Waltzing Matilda

“Unofficial Australian National Anthem” , Lyrics by A.B. Paterson

“Once a jolly swagman camped by a billabong,

Under the shade of a Coolibah tree,

And he sang as he watched and waited till his billy boil,
You’ll come a Waltzing Matilda with me.

Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda,
You’ll come a Waltzing Matilda with me,
And he sang as he watched and waited till his billy boil
You’ll come a Waltzing Matilda with me.
………………..
Down came a jumbuck to drink at that billabong
Up jumped the swagman and grabbed him with glee,
And he sang as he shoved that jumbuck in his tucker bag
You’ll come a Waltzing Matilda with me.

Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda,
You’ll come a Waltzing Matilda with me,
And he sang as he shoved that jumbuck in his tucker bag
You’ll come a Waltzing Matilda with me.
…………………
Up rode the squatter mounted on his thorough-bred
Down came the troopers One Two Three
Whose that jolly jumbuck you’ve got in your tucker bag
You’ll come a Waltzing Matilda with me.

Waltzing Matilda Waltzing Matilda
You’ll come a Waltzing Matilda with me
Whose that jolly jumbuck you’ve got in your tucker-bag
You’ll come a Waltzing Matilda with me.
………………….
Up jumped the swagman sprang in to the billabong
You’ll never catch me alive said he,
And his ghost may be heard as you pass by that billabong
You’ll come a Waltzing Matilda with me.

Waltzing Matilda Waltzing Matilda
You’ll come a Waltzing Matilda with me
And his ghost may be heard as you pass by that billabong
You’ll come a Waltzing Matilda with me.

creepy-crawly (krē′pē krôl′ē)

 

Creepy and Crawley

creepy-crawly (krē′pē krôl′ē)

noun pl. creepy-crawlies -·ies 

Slang something, as a crawling insect or spider, regarded as frightening and repugnant

Webster’s New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio. 

There’s a large Daddy-Long-Legs climbing up the baseboard.  I’m not fearful of Daddy-Long-Legs.  Don’t want him creepy crawling up my leg but I’m not fearful.

Flash back to my blog post  Dec 21st, Fears I’ve Overcome and Those to Come https://judithwesterfield.wordpress.com/2010/12/21/fears-ive-overcome-and-those-to-come/ .   In the comments almost everyone included some kind of creepy-crawly in their fear list.  The creepy-crawly that stood out most came from:

josiespeaksup.blogspot.com/

“So, what am I afraid of?

Huntsmen (icky, although I have rescued myself from one last year)”

Thinking she didn’t want to be involved in a relationship with a man who hunted, since her preceding sentence was about falling in love, I responded back:

What are “huntsmen”?  My California dictionary calls them “hunters” – people who shoot little animals for sport.  I actually was surprised when

Josie replied:

In Australia a huntsman is a large brown spider with very long legs. It usually lives in pergolas and likes to come inside, hunting for prey. It has been known to drop down out of a tree onto people at night- not to bite, but just its way of getting around! Usually there is an appointed “huntsman catcher” in the household who pursues the poor thing with a broom and bucket, afterwards dumping the contents outside (we don’t kill them).

Australian Pet Huntsman Spider

 

 

http://www.cutehomepets.com/long-legged-huntsman-spider-facts/

Thanks Josie for one more thing to add to my list of fears should I ever travel to Australia!

I think I’ll go tell Daddy-Long-Legs he’s got nothing to be afraid of.

Added information from another “Aussie”!!!!!!!

http://phylor.wordpress.com

Depending of the size and “look” of the spider, it faces several “fates:” big and scary gets caught under the glass, and transported outside; small and scary goes to the plants in the porch; big or small and not scary stay where they are, tho I do tidy up their “nests,” “webs,” and “leftovers.” Mostly “jumpy” spiders that stay.
My creepy-crawly “get it out of the house NOW” are centepedes and millepedes. Confession time: earwigs I just kill. Then, I’m the “hunter,” and the earwig the “prey.”