Spring is in the air, Shooting from my Haiku Hip, Spring me a big tip

P. S. Take a look at the Workshop and Groups Page!

Two 4-week Therapeutic Creative Expression groups

starting March 2nd.

The HEart of Spirituality

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A spring in my step
Love is blooming everywhere
a light in my heart 

Spring has sprung today
quick step in my little toes
flowers, sun, hooray

by Nancy

the springs in my brain

Some are right, a few are wrong

have sprung a few sprongs

Haiku-Heights, prompt SPRING

Alone or Lonely: Which is Worse?

  • Collage, Mitten-hands stop me from reaching out. Noodle-brain -in my mind, not my heart

    First, I’ve been feeling a bit lonely lately.  Lonely in the sense I’ve not had time, taken time, to be in contact with my good friends, locked in my home office with paperwork.

    Second, I saw an interview on one of the morning shows about how some women were choosing not to marry at all or wait until their late 30’s, 40’s or 50’s — how their lives “alone” were not lonely.

    Third, I was talking to a friend about how difficult, how lonely it must be for someone to lose a spouse through death.
    She looked at me with a slight questioning surprise in her eyes when I said that it can often be more painful to be alone in a relationship than lonely without one.

    The question of which being more painful, alone or lonely, is an interesting one.
    In my practice, I see the anguish of couples who are without connection, without love, without companionship while IN a relationship.  I’m absolutely not diminishing the anguish, the pain of losing a beloved spouse or partner.

    I’m simply saying that loss through death can be mourned and the finality, while always difficult, can be acknowledged and accepted.  
    When the relationship is dead and both partners are still alive the grieving never stops, the pain often keeps increasing rather than diminishing.

    For those of us with chronic medical conditions there is often a pervasive sense of being alone.  A thought that no one can really understand, no one can help even if they want to, that we have been abandoned by God or worse yet, being punished . . .

    I think that loneliness has to do more with our state of mind than state of our body or state of our relationships: How we view the world;  How we define our expectations, fantasies, shoulds, coulds and woulds.
    Upon more reflection the most devastating might be  
    being alone AND lonely,
     also a state of mind.
    Powerful thing that noodle-brain.

Depressed, Anxious? You’re Not Crazy & sneaking in a Judaiku

Judy's visual journal entry

My favorite antidote for anxiety was the topic of yesterday’s post.  Today I want to briefly address depression since anxiety and depression often go hand in hand.

Acute, situational depression is the brain’s way of helping us not blow our lid or slit our throats.  When we’re depressed we don’t have the highs or the lows – everything is “flat”.  It’s when the depression lasts longer than the situation warrants and becomes chronic that something needs to be done.

To add insult to injury, clients I see with depression and anxiety  experience trouble with sleep:  Falling asleep ; Staying asleep; Never getting restorative rest.

This is important!

Research findings suggest that there is a neurochemical link between depression, anxiety, and stress.  This has nothing to do with psychology or character or any psychiatric disorder.  This is about disturbances in neurochemical functioning in the brain.  You’re not crazy, not psychological damaged or fragile.  Your neurochemistry is out of wack if you are depressed and/or anxious.

Many of the symptoms of anxiety disorders and depression overlap quite a bit. Depression can lead to anxiety and conversely, anxiety can lead to depression. So we’re talking about a very tight relationship here in terms of diagnosis.

When I was first licensed in 1986 anxiety was treated with different medication than depression.  Today many, if not most, people with anxiety are treated and respond very well to anti-depressant medication.

On Call Plus
ABC News Photo Illustration
NOW THE GOOD NEWS!

Research has shown that the best ways of breaking the depressive cycle are:  1.  EXERCISE, 2. COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY, 3.  MEDICATION

IN THAT ORDER!

The good news is you can do the first two on your own, no Rx and the only side effects are feeling better.

    • Now sneaking in my Haiku for today: Prompt – “hidden”

    Depression visits

Hidden depths, silent despair

Uninvited guest