Survival Of The Laziest

Now, I’m no mollusk but I do know that as I’ve aged I’ve slowed down . . . along with my metabolism.  Turns out this is GOOD news:

Less Active Species May Live Longer

“This is what a group of researchers from the University of Kansas found after taking a close look at some extinct as well as living species . . . analyzing the physiology and evolution of as many as 299 species of aquatic mollusks — including present-day snails and slugs — over last five million years.”

“They delved into the occurrences and extinction of different species over the said period as well as their respective metabolic rates or the amount of energy each of the creature in question needed for survival.”

“Much to everyone’s surprise, the findings of the work revealed that metabolic rates make a reliable factor for predicting the likelihood of extinction of a certain animal species or community of species.”

“We found a difference for mollusk species that have gone extinct over the past 5 million years and ones that are still around today.  Those that have gone extinct tend to have higher metabolic rates than those that are still living . . . those that have lower energy maintenance requirements seem more likely to survive than those organisms with higher metabolic rates.”*

“Maybe in the long-term the best evolutionary strategy for animals is to be lassitudinous and sluggish — the lower the metabolic rate, the more likely the species you belong to will survive . . . Instead of ‘survival of the fittest,’ maybe a better metaphor for the history of life is ‘survival of the laziest’ or at least ‘survival of the sluggish.'”**

I was going to go for a brisk walk but I’ll take a nap instead and . . .

live to walk another day.

judy

*Luke Strotz, lead author of the study

**co-author Bruce Lieberman

Idle or Lazy? I Prefer Physics

“Inertia is the resistance of any physical object (read “Judy”) to a change in its state of motion or rest (the later, not the former), or the tendency of an object (“read Judy”) to resist any change in its motion.”

“The principle of inertia is one of the fundamental principles of classical physics which are used to describe the motion of matter and how it is affected by applied forces. Inertia comes from the Latin word, iners, meaning idle, or lazy” (I prefer the meaning of “resting”). Wikipedia

I was talking to a wonderful client today, smart, perceptive, talented, dedicated to personal growth (how can that NOT be wonderful), about having inspirations and aspirations but doing nothing about them other than thinking.  Was it fear of failure?, avoidance of success?, lack of focus, ability?   All of the above?  I flashed on my blogging (hey, sometimes it IS about ME . . .)

I had blogged almost daily for a few years.  Then recently my heart went wack-o (literally) and I just didn’t have the where-with-all to think much less write.  

It’s been a struggle to get back into the habit of talking to all of you. (well, no, to be truthful I’ve not struggled as that implies movement).  It’s been out-of-sight-out-of-mind-floating-around-in-the-ether-what-have-I-got-to-say-anyway kind of thing.

How many times in my life – in YOUR life – has inertia of motion kept me doing a task that was needed or important to me.  And how many times in my life – yours too – has inertia of rest kept me from doing something potentially gratifying?   I admit it’s happened in more areas then I’d like to admit.

Not everything is psychology.  Much of the time it’s just physics.  Nice to be able to blame something other than my psyche.

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