Giant Tree Lobster – pass the butter

Giant Tree Lobsters were thought to be extinct until discovered on a remote island near Australia.  And it’s not a hoax . . .  like the Tree Octopus.

To read about their “romantic” come back and take a look at what they look like full-grown click here: Meet the Tree Lobster, back from the brink

Take a look at the birth! . . . meditative and remarkable!


Green when young, and about the size of an adult human’s hand when full-grown, Dryococelus australis is more commonly known as the Lord Howe Island stick insect, or the tree lobster.
Courtesy of Rohan Cleave/Melbourne Zoo

“The nymph that comes out of the egg is about three times the size of the egg itself,” says Paige Howorth, the San Diego Zoo’s curator of entomology. “It’s just folded up in there like an origami piece or something — it’s amazing.”

It has been claimed that the males and females snooze together, cuddled up in pairs, with the male wrapping his six legs protectively around the female. But Howorth says assuming that the sleep position connotes affection would be premature.

“I don’t know if it means he loves her,” she says, laughing. “I’m not willing to say that.”