What you see is not always what you “get” – rhythm

What’s He Saying? ‘Bahh’ Or ‘Fahh’? A Brain Mystery

“I love illusions, where your brain makes weird things happen. Those of you who come here often have seen some doozies, but this one … oooh, this is one of the strangest.

The question is: Which is more powerful, your eyes or your ears? Watch this clip and experience “The McGurk Effect.” Your ears will feel ashamed.”

“The McGurk Effect is named for a psychologist from Scotland, Harry McGurk, working with John MacDonald. The experiment shows that while our senses seem separate — you wouldn’t think what you see should affect what you hear — it turns out, that’s totally wrong. If our eyes see one thing and our ears hear a different thing, when sight and sound grapple in our brains, the eyes win. Eyes tell ears what to hear. Or so it seems.

Not only that, even if your brain knows this is an illusion, you still can’t hear the truth unless you close your eyes. The illusion is that powerful.

Why Does This Happen?

Does sight always beat sound? Professor Lawrence Rosenblum in the video seems to suggest that experimental results may vary depending on which sense is “more salient.” I’m not sure what that means. Nosing around, I found some experiments where you see lips saying “gah” while the sound is saying “bah” and my brain chooses neither of them, and settles for a middle-of-the-road “dah.” But nowhere could I find an explanation for why my ears keep surrendering to my eyes.

Does anybody know?”

Sight and sound grapple

Ears surrendering to eyes

Our reality?

Earth zips through space-time

All the senses unaware

What’s reality?

Time an illusion

Eternity an unknown

The reality?

Why and what are we ?

 Breathing rhythmically with life

Only God can know

Can Compassion be Taught?

A blogger friend asked me this question.  Can compassion be taught?
My primitive thoughts:

1.  To be compassionate we have to put our egos aside.  When self-importance, personal need, greed drive us compassion fades.

2. People must be willing to learn.  What’s the saying? You can lead a human to God but you can’t make him believe.

3. Humans can be taught HOW to be compassionate toward others. 

An example that I come across every time I do couples counseling is that each partner intends compassion while the other partner experiences it as hurt or neglect.  The disparity between INTENTION and EXPERIENCE is based on how each of us PERCEIVES our “reality”.

Ex: The man is being compassionate when he tries to find a solution to the wife’s pain and all she wants is a shoulder to cry on and arms around her.  A wife is being compassionate when she expresses FEELINGS by putting  her arms around him when all he wants is her to bring him a hot meal and stop shopping.

Yes, these are stereotypes but substitute what you “do” to show compassion and you can teach yourself how to match your partners experience to you intention.  Just do what your partner wants instead of what you want.  Fill out the blanks to figure it out.

  • When I show compassion I (behavior)________________ therefore that’s what I want from my partner.
  • When my partner shows compassion he/she (behavior)______________________therefore that’s what he/she wants in return.

Almost to a fault you can believe that whatever one person DOES to show their compassion is precisely what they WANT in return.

4. The easiest way to teach compassion is to put the individual in situations with people less fortunate.  World travel, volunteering, support groups, charitable work are all ways of finding compassion.  Internet chat rooms and forums play similar roles.  (I am not yet convinced that having some kind of direct contact is still not the best way to develop compassion but technology has given us the way of behaving compassionately at a distance.)

After compassion is LOVE.

Can you teach love?