“Playboy Tortoise had so much SEX he saved his entire species”

DISCLAIMER: We’ve taken note that sex sells . . . or at least boosts the number of hits (no pun intended) . . . on the blog, not us . . . So in an unabashed ploy to raise our “ranking” . . . this article is by Rob Picheta, CNN, not Peggy, Judy nor Freddie.

  * .   * .   *

(CNN)”A womanizing tortoise whose rampant sex life may have single-handedly saved his entire species from extinction has retired from his playboy lifestyle, returning to the wild with his mission accomplished.”

Diego’s unstoppable libido was credited as a major reason for the survival of his fellow giant tortoises on Espanola, part of the Galapagos Islands, after being shipped over from the San Diego Zoo as part of a breeding program.”
“When he started his campaign of promiscuity, there were just two males and 12 females of his species alive on the island.”
“But the desirable shell-dweller had so much sex he helped boost the population to over 2,000. The Galapagos National Parks service believe the 100-year-old tortoise is the patriarch of around 40% of that population.
“He’s contributed a large percentage to the lineage that we are returning to Espanola,” Jorge Carrion, the park’s director, told AFP. “There’s a feeling of happiness to have the possibility of returning that tortoise to his natural state.”‘

Diego’s good looks made him a hit on the island.

“A total of 15 tortoises took part in the breeding program to boost the island’s population, but none played a big a role as Diego.”
“About 1,800 tortoises have been returned to Espanola and now with natural reproduction we have approximately 2,000 tortoises,” Carrion told AFP.”
“This shows that they are able to grow, they are able to reproduce, they are able to develop,” he said.”

Now that’s what we call WILD LIFE.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/11/americas/diego-playboy-tortoise-sex-life-galapagos-scli-intl/index.html

Skunk Bear to Skunk Car – past & future

My contribution to science . . . for today.  

NPR SkunkBear channel

Thanks Linda B!

Frankly Freddie – Top 10 cutest animals in science for 2014

Dear Human-beings,

It’s never to early to plan ahead.  I’m thinking to qualify for the Top 10 Cutest Animals in Science for 2015.  I just have to figure out the science part.  Any ideas?

Freddie Parker Westerfield, CA

Freddie Parker Westerfield, CA Cute Animal
Freddie Parker Westerfield, CA
Cute Animal

Just Ducky!

There once was an unfortunate duck

 whose love life completely sucked 

his brown feet ignored

 leaving the ladies quite bored

He’s genetically out of luck

Unlucky Ducky

Unlucky Ducky

Why Do Ducks Have Orange Feet?

By Bjorn Carey

“. . .  for the ducks that do have orange feet, well, it’s all about attracting the ladies. Chicks dig orange.”

“Bright orange coloring suggests that a male duck, also known as a drake, is getting all his vitamins, particularly carotenoids, such as beta-carotene and vitamin A, antioxidants that can be beneficial to the immune system. “This indicates that his behaviors and genes are good enough for him to recognize and eat the right food, or that his immune system is strong enough to produce bright orange legs,” Omland says. “The female sees this as a very attractive trait to pass on to her offspring.”‘

“Omland’s work only looked at drakes’ bills, but he thinks there’s enough circumstantial evidence to say that ducks check out each other’s feet, too. “Blue-footed boobies have, obviously, very blue feet, and it’s very well documented that they use their feet in courtship and that females do care about the coloration of males’ feet,” Omland says. “Perhaps mallards, like the boobies, have a foot fetish.”‘

Don’t believe me??  Read it here: Why do ducks have orange feet?

Dolphins

Baby bottlenose dolphin Doerte and her mother Delphi swim through their basin on October 18, 2011 at the zoo in Duisburg, western Germany.

Baby bottlenose dolphin Doerte and her mother Delphi swim through their basin on October 18, 2011 at the zoo in Duisburg, western Germany.

“Science continues to show that what we think makes us human, may not be so unique: New research finds that bottlenose dolphins call the “names of loved ones when they become separated,” Discovery News reports.”

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/02/20/172538036/researchers-find-that-dolphins-call-each-other-by-name?ft=1&f=1001