When people can see TIME

Time . . . we pass through it . . . or perhaps it passes through us . . . but do we SEE it?  Take a look: 

“I photograph by hand; this is not a time lapse. It’s my eye seeing very specific moments.  I like to describe myself as a collector.”  Steven Wilkes

“Once Wilkes has all the images, he picks the best moments of the day and the night and creates what he calls a master plate. Those images then get seamlessly blended into one single photograph, where time is on a diagonal vector, with sunrise beginning in the bottom right-hand corner. That process of creating a single image can take about four months — though it’s photographed in a single day.
of magical moments.”‘

View from The Savoy, London, Day to Night, 2013. Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

View from The Savoy, London, Day to Night, 2013.
Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

Times Square, NYC, Day to Night, 2010. Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

Times Square, NYC, Day to Night, 2010.
Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

Pont de la Tournelle, Paris, Day to Night, 2013. Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

Pont de la Tournelle, Paris, Day to Night, 2013.
Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes

In this last photo of Serengeti National Park in Tanzania – “For 26 hours, Wilkes shot 2,200 photos without moving the camera and while suspended in the air in a tent-like structure with a little window, so that animals wouldn’t see or hear him as he photographed them coming to a watering hole from sunrise to deep into the night.”

Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, Day to Night, 2015. Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes/National Geographic

Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, Day to Night, 2015.
Courtesy of Stephen Wilkes/National Geographic

Read the interview and article by Nina Gregory here ‘When People Can See Time’: Photographer Captures Day, Night In One Image

Take a look at Stephen Wilkes Gallery Day to Night