Sugar Shun – No bags, no butter no oil!

Rosemary Lee Seeking Equilibrium is my hero:  She is doing the “shuck the sugar” for a month with me – and gasp! – she threw away Oreo cookies that were next to her bed:
She sent me this:
“This works!!  I had some with some cumin and salt for a southwest popcorn.
For the popcorn lovers!!!  Microwave popcorn, no bags, no butter, no oil!!!!  It’s genius really. Simple, simple genius.
Glass bowl + ceramic plate + popcorn kernels = perfectly popped popcorn in the microwave.  No bag. No butter or oil. Nothing to throw away afterward. And even no un-popped kernels.
  • Take 1/4 cup of dry popcorn kernels and place in the bottom of a microwave-safe glass bowl (pyrex is a great choice).
  • Place a microwave-safe plate on top of the bowl. Plate should be wide enough to go beyond the rim of the bowl.
  • Microwave for 2 minutes 45 seconds. Watch in glory as your popcorn pops perfectly into little puffs of heaven.”
photo

 Corny Facts

  • Americans consume some 16 billion quarts of this whole grain, good-for-you treat. That’s 51 quarts per man, woman, and child.
  • Compared to most snack foods, popcorn is low in calories. Air-popped popcorn has only 31 calories per cup. Oil-popped is only 55 per cup.
  • Popcorn differs from other types of maize/corn in that is has a thicker pericarp/hull. The hull allows pressure from the heated water to build and eventually bursts open. The inside starch becomes gelatinous while being heated; when the hull bursts, the gelatinized starch spills out and cools, giving it its familiar popcorn shape.
  • Most popcorn comes in two basic shapes when it’s popped: snowflake and mushroom. Snowflake is used in movie theaters and ballparks because it looks and pops bigger. Mushroom is used for candy confections because it doesn’t crumble.
  • “Popability” is popcorn lingo that refers to the percentage of kernels that pop.
  • How high popcorn kernels can pop? Up to 3 feet in the air.
  • The world’s largest popcorn ball was created by volunteers in Sac City, Iowa in February, 2009.  It weighed 5,000 lbs., stood over 8 ft. tall, and measured 28.8 ft. in circumference.
  • If you made a trail of popcorn from New York City to Los Angeles, you would need more than 352,028,160 popped kernels!

P.S. Rosemary, there are only a few people (besides Laurie F.)  who would describe popped corn as “little puffs of heaven” and you are one of them! 

“Ode” to Sugar

Refined sugar is my drug of choice.   Lately I’ve been on a binge.   When my energy is flagging sugar is my go-to drug.  It’s also my choice when I’m bored . . .in pain . . . when I’m sad, happy . . . when it’s raining . . . snowing (anywhere in the world) . . . cloudy, clear, night or day . . .  

O’ lovely sugar

sweetest seductress ever

you never grow stale

*

O’  sugar of mine

as pure as the falling snow

cooling my senses

*

O’ sugar my love

with pangs in my head &  heart

you are a goner

I’ve not been feeling very well lately and no longer know which comes first – sugar or my symptoms.  Ultimately it makes no matter for I know that sugar is not good for me.  For the next month I’m going to ATTEMPT to keep refined sugar and it’s “carrier” white flour at least 10 feet from my lips.  (I was going to say mouth but I need those extra inches for safety.)

judy's journal, collage

judy’s journal, collage

I’ve tried abstaining from eating refined sugar before . . . . wish me strength of character and will (luck isn’t going to cut it). 

P.S.  Rosemary Lee, Seeking Equilibrium, is joining me.  Anyone else?  

Add your name in the comments box.  I dare you!

Mr Sandman the Ostrich – WP prompt

judy's ostrich

judy’s ostrich

I identify with the ostrich. My neck is rather short.  My legs are not refined.  In danger, like my friend the ostrich, I can’t fly.  At my age the best I do is ruffle my feathers and slowly walk away on my short unrefined legs.

My “ostrichness” is above the neck.  I frequently stick my head in the sand. It’s gets more and more gritty the older I get.  

I act like I’m still 30 years old. (I pick 30 because I was a tiny bit smarter than 20 and a lot more energetic than 40).  Now that I’m in my 60’s, after running around like I’m 30, I go to bed for the same number of days, resting my old, short unrefined legs after first washing sand out of my mouth.

Postscript:  I’m going to have to pick another animal to identify with. I just made the mistake of googling; “To dispel the ancient libel, ostriches do not bury their heads when faced with danger–a species that did so would hardly be able to survive for more than 120 million years. They do, however, stretch their long necks flat on the ground when they sleep; from a distance, it can look as though their heads are buried”. (How Stuff Works)

ANCIENT, that’s the last thing I needed to hear.

*        *        *

This post inspired by Rosemary Lee for including an ostrich in her fibromyalgia post at SEEKING EQUILIBRIUM a

The Prompt SANDMAN  at http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/03/23/daily-prompt-mr-sandman/

My ostrich drawing for Year of the Fairly Tale at http://carlasonheim.wordpress.com

A Dessert . . . er . . . Desert, to die for

Just Desserts

Death by chocolate

all reason leaves the being

breath taken away

Death by chocolate

quickening pulse overtakes

heart stops with desire

Stay with vanilla

languishing longings subside

live a longer life

Whoops!!  Sorry, wrong prompt!!

Here’s the correct prompt . . .

Just Deserts

Death in the desert

All moisture leaves the body

breath taken away

Death in the desert
slow pulse life slipping away
heart stops with the heat

Stay in the suburbs

cozy, comfortable, cool

Die by chocolate

_____________________________________________________

NOW!  Click on Rosemary Lee’s post to see what chocolate LITERALLY does to YOU!

Seeking Equilibrium THE BLISS MOLECULE

No Left Turns

Those of you who follow Max’s Blog know that we love to post other people’s creative expressions.  Right now I’m sitting on a back log.  After re-reading this I decided that I’d better start sharing them with you before my expiration date runs out.  

  • I received this from Rosemary Lee at SEEKING EQUILIBRIUM
  • It’s long.  
  • It’s worth your time to read.

Rosemary LeeSEEKING EQUILIBRIUM 

“This is a wonderful story that I wanted to share with all my friends…I hope it makes you reflect a little on the good things in your life and makes you smile…even laugh”

“My father never drove a car. Well, that’s not quite right. I should say I
never saw him drive a car.

He quit driving in 1927, when he was 25 years old, and the last car he
drove was a 1926 Whippet.

“In those days,” he told me when he was in his 90s, “to drive a car you
had to do things with your hands, and do things with your feet, and look
every which way, and I decided you could walk through life and enjoy it or drive through life and miss it.”

At which point my mother, a sometimes salty Irishwoman, chimed in: “Oh, baloney!” she said. “He hit a horse.”

“Well,” my father said, “there was that, too.”

So my brother and I grew up in a household without a car. The neighbors
all had cars — the Kollingses next door had a green 1941 Dodge, the Van Laninghams across the street a gray 1936 Plymouth, the Hopsons two doors down a black 1941 Ford — but we had none.

My father, a newspaperman in Des Moines , would take the streetcar to work and, often as not, walk the 3 miles home. If he took the streetcar home, my mother and brother and I would walk the three blocks to the streetcar stop, meet him and walk home together.

My brother, David, was born in 1935, and I was born in 1938, and sometimes, at dinner, we’d ask how come all the neighbors had cars but we had none. “No one in the family drives,” my mother would explain, and that was that.

But, sometimes, my father would say, “But as soon as one of you boys turns 16, we’ll get one.” It was as if he wasn’t sure which one of us would turn 16 first.

But, sure enough , my brother turned 16 before I did, so in 1951 my parents bought a used 1950 Chevrolet from a friend who ran the parts department at a Chevy dealership downtown..

It was a four-door, white model, stick shift, fender skirts, loaded with everything, and, since my parents didn’t drive, it more or less became my brother’s car.

Having a car but not being able to drive didn’t bother my father, but it didn’t make sense to my mother..

So in 1952, when she was 43 years old, she asked a friend to teach her to drive. She learned in a nearby cemetery, the place where I learned to drive the following year and where, a generation later, I took my two sons to practice driving. The cemetery probably was my father’s idea. “Who can your mother hurt in the cemetery?” I remember him saying more than once.

For the next 45 years or so, until she was 90, my mother was the driver in the family. Neither she nor my father had any sense of direction, but he loaded up on maps — though they seldom left the city limits — and
appointed himself navigator. It seemed to work.

Still, they both continued to walk a lot. My mother was a devout Catholic, and my father an equally devout agnostic, an arrangement that didn’t seem to bother either of them through their 75 years of marriage.

(Yes, 75 years, and they were deeply in love the entire time.)

He retired when he was 70, and nearly every morning for the next 20 years or so, he would walk with her the mile to St. Augustin’s Church. She would walk down and sit in the front pew, and he would wait in the
back until he saw which of the parish’s two priests was on duty that morning. If it was the pastor, my father then would go out and take a 2-mile walk, meeting my mother at the end of the service and walking her
home.

If it was the assistant pastor, he’d take just a 1-mile walk and then head back to the church. He called the priests “Father Fast” and “Father Slow.”

After he retired, my father almost always accompanied my mother whenever she drove anywhere, even if he
had no reason to go along. If she were going to the beauty parlor, he’d sit in the car and read, or go take a
stroll or, if it was summer, have her keep the engine running so he could listen to the Cubs game on the radio. In the evening, then, when I’d stop by, he’d explain: “The Cubs lost again. The millionaire on second base
made a bad throw to the millionaire on first base, so the multimillionaire on third base scored.”

If she were going to the grocery store, he would go along to carry the bags out — and to make sure she loaded up on ice cream. As I said, he was always the navigator, and once, when he was 95 and she was 88 and still
driving, he said to me, “Do you want to know the secret of a long life?”

“I guess so,” I said, knowing it probably would be something bizarre.

“No left turns,” he said.

“What?” I asked.

“No left turns,” he repeated. “Several years ago, your mother and I
read
an article that said most accidents that old people are in happen when
they turn left in front of oncoming traffic.

As you get older, your eyesight worsens, and you can lose your depth
perception, it said. So your mother and I decided never again to make a
left turn.”

“What?” I said again.

“No left turns,” he said. “Think about it.. Three rights are the same as a left, and that’s a lot safer. So we always make three rights..”

“You’re kidding!” I said, and I turned to my mother for support.
“No,” she said, “your father is right. We make three rights. It works.”
But then she added: “Except when your father loses count.”

I was driving at the time, and I almost drove off the road as I started laughing.

“Loses count?” I asked.

“Yes,” my father admitted, “that sometimes happens. But it’s not a problem. You just make seven rights, and you’re okay again.”

I couldn’t resist. “Do you ever go for 11?” I asked.

“No,” he said ” If we miss it at seven, we just come home and call it a bad day. Besides, nothing in life is so important it can’t be put off another day or another week.” My mother was never in an accident, but one evening she handed me her car keys and said she had decided to quit driving. That was in 1999, when she
was 90.

She lived four more years, until 2003.  My father died the next year, at 102.

They both died in the bungalow they had moved into in 1937 and bought a few years later for $3,000. (Sixty years later, my brother and I paid $8,000 to have a shower put in the tiny bathroom — the house had never had one. My father would have died then and there if he knew the shower cost nearly three times what he paid for the house.)

He continued to walk daily — he had me get him a treadmill when he was 101 because he was afraid he’d fall on the icy sidewalks but wanted to keep exercising — and he was of sound mind and sound body until the
moment he died.

One September afternoon in 2004, he and my son went with me when I had to give a talk in a neighboring town, and it was clear to all three of us that he was wearing out, though we had the usual wide-ranging conversation about politics and newspapers and things in the news.

A few weeks earlier, he had told my son, “You know, Mike, the first hundred years are a lot easier than the second hundred.” At one point in our drive that Saturday, he said, “You know, I’m probably not going to
live much longer.”

“You’re probably right,” I said.

“Why would you say that?” He countered, somewhat irritated.

“Because you’re 102 years old,” I said..

“Yes,” he said, “you’re right.” He stayed in bed all the next day.

That night, I suggested to my son and daughter that we sit up with him through the night.

He appreciated it, he said, though at one point, apparently seeing us look gloomy, he said:
“I would like to make an announcement. No one in this room is dead yet”

An hour or so later, he spoke his last words:

“I want you to know,” he said, clearly and lucidly, “that I am in no pain.
I am very comfortable. And I have had as happy a life as anyone on this earth could ever have.”

A short time later, he died.

I miss him a lot, and I think about him a lot. I’ve wondered now and then how it was that my family and I were so lucky that he lived so long..

I can’t figure out if it was because he walked through life,
Or because he quit taking left turns. “

  • Life is too short to wake up with regrets.
  • So love the people who treat you right.
  • Forget about the one’s who don’t.
  • Believe everything happens for a reason.
  • If you get a chance,take it & if it changes your life, let it.
  • Nobody said life would be easy, they just promised it would most likely be worth it.
  • ENJOY LIFE NOW – IT HAS AN EXPIRATION DATE!”

Kiss UP to the Contest WINNERS!

I am UP and announcing the winners of the  Up Up & away Contest and doing the daily Haiku.  Thought it UP myself. Clever!

http://judithwesterfield.wordpress.com/2011/09/02/win-this-contest-up-up-and-away/

 Winners ALL are YOU

Kissing UP, the sweetest treat

You’re lip smacking good!

Welcome to Day 6 of The Height of Haiku Challenge, where your challenge is to write 30 haiku in 30 days, with the themes given here. The prompt today and #64 overall is KISS suggested by Nimue.                www.haiku-heights.com

TA DA!

Up Side Down Category Winner

Ida:  Stand up. Stand down

UP-Chuck Category Winners

Joyce Klenner:  Cough it up!

Maureen Killham-Kaech:  

http://moisbloggingithink.wordpress.com/

I really thought I was going to throw UP because I was so nauseous, but then you cracked me UP with this post, and so I didn’t.

Rub Up to Rose Category Winner

Laurie Fessler:  I think Rose is an UP and coming genius!

hibernationnow.wordpress.com

Looking Good Looking Up Category Winner

Terri Hodges:  I looked up to see a label this end up!

Ending Up, Up Beat Category Winner

Phylor   I think rose and judith are UP and coming creative folks.

phylor.wordpress.com

and if you are up for “SEEKING EQUILIBRIUM”

take a look at Rose’s  blog http://www.rosemaryl.blogspot.com/

Rose set me UP for the original post.  Rose,  I gave you a leg up!  So you’re a winner too!

Winners: Type UP your name, mailing address and Hypnotic Healing Recording you choose from the selection on the HYPNOTIC HEALING CD page on this blog: https://judithwesterfield.wordpress.com/hypnotic-healing-cds/  and

send to me in an e-mail:  judithwesterfield@gmail.com

YOU can Win this Contest: Up Up and Away!

Falling DOWN side UP?

Win a free Hypnotic Healing Recording!

Win notoriety for your grammatical excellence, for your knowledge of the English language, for your keen mind,

for your perseverance, for being up to date and up to the challenge of

submitting  all the different ways UP is used that are not up-loaded in this post.

Now . . . UP is a two-letter word that perhaps has more meanings than any other two-letter word

  • It’s easy to understand UP, meaning toward the sky or at the top of the list, but
  • when we awaken in the morning, why do we wake UP ?
  • At a meeting, why does a topic come UP?
  • Why do we speak UP and
  • why are the officers UP for election and
  • why is it UP to the secretary to write UP a report?
  • We call UP our friends.
  • People stir UP trouble, line UP for tickets, work UP an appetite, and think UP excuses.
  • To be dressed is one thing, but to be dressed UP is special.
  • A drain must be opened UP because it is stopped UP.
  • And we use it to brighten UP a room, polish UP the silver;
  • we warm UP the leftovers and clean UP the kitchen.
  • We lock UP the house and some guys fix UP the old car..
  • We open UP a store in the morning but we close it UP at night.
  • We seem to be pretty mixed UP about UP!

Rules:

  1. Use the word “up” in a sentence or a phrase that has not been used in this post.
  2. DO NOT look the word UP in a dictionary because in a desk-sized dictionary, up takes UP almost 1/4th of the page and can add UP to about thirty definitions.
  3. Send your entry in ONE (1) comment (in the comment box) to this post:  https://judithwesterfield.wordpress.com/2011/09/02/win-this-contest-up-up-and-away/   (I will not count up the number of UP’s sent to me by e-mail or multiple comments)
  4. Deadline for submissions:  Monday, September 5th 5 pm

So if you are UP to it,  try building UP a list of the many ways UP is used and send it.

Falling UP side DOWN?

It will take UP a lot of your time, but if you don’t give UP, you may wind UP with a hundred or more and be the winner of a free Hypnotic Healing Recording!

Don’t let UP get you down.

Thanks to

http://www.rosemaryl.blogspot.com/

“SEEKING EQUILIBRIUM”

for this post!

Rose, for sending this to me I’m giving you a leg up!

5 extra credit points!

P.S.  Check up Rose’s blog to see what kind of person would up and send me this!